Poetry at the Bette Tonight

woman facing assorted painting with frame
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Poetry at the Bette
Saturday, February 9, 2019
7-9 pm
Featuring Joyce Young, Judy Juanita and Will Preston
Hosted by Jeanne Lupton
Poetry and Prose
Frank Bette Center for the Arts
1601 Paru Street
Alameda, CA 94501
https://www.frankbettecenter.org/featured-poets.html
https://www.frankbettecenter.org/poetry-at-the-bette.html
Open Mic

It’s a pleasure to read at The Frank Bette Center in Alameda, CA in a Victorian style building where art is made and displayed on the walls in rotating gallery shows.

I’ll have copies of my book “How it Happens” for sale, just in case you haven’t purchased yours, yet.

Upcoming Readings

I have two readings scheduled for this month and I’d love to see you at one or both of them.

Saturday, February 2, 2019 – TONIGHT!
7-9 pm
Nomadic Press First Saturday Showcase
Featuring Mk Chavez, Joyce Young, Melissa Jones. Music by Nick Stephens
Oakland Peace Center
111 Fairmount Ave
Oakland, CA 94611
Facebook Event Page

Saturday, February 9, 2019
7-9 pm
Featuring Joyce Young
Poetry and Prose
Frank Bette Center for the Arts
1601 Paru Street
Alameda, CA 94501
https://www.frankbettecenter.org/featured-poets.html
https://www.frankbettecenter.org/poetry-at-the-bette.html
Open Mic

 

Reading in the Rain

view of books in shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Lyrics & Dirges at Pegasus Bookstore Downtown Berkeley was the best place to be on a stormy Wednesday evening. A huge thank you to series cofounder and host Sharon Coleman for setting the tone, which is always welcoming and encouraging of the writers and the audience.

Surrounded by books, writers and an appreciative audience was wonderful. Kimi Sugioka, Sara Mumolo, Joseph Lease took us on journeys of the heart and mind. What teachers and students need in public education, motherhood, loving friendship interrupted by death, and the wisdom of lizard in the face of law enforcement were some of the journeys we writers took with audience members.

Libraries and independent bookstores and the books they offer to us have been places of peace for me and I hope that they continue to be for as many of us as possible despite the current landscape of chaos, confusion and change.

I encourage you to visit and purchase used or new books and catch the annual calendar sale (one of my favorites) at Pegasus and attend a Lyrics & Dirges reading. You can find out about the February Lyrics & Dirges here You can find out more about Pegasus bookstores here

Long live Lyrics & Dirges and its cofounders and co-hosts Mk Chavez and Sharon Coleman and long live independent bookstores.

And if you haven’t yet purchased my book How it Happens, hop on over to the Nomadic Press website and do so here

Lyrics & Dirges at Pegasus Bookstore Downtown Berkeley on Wednesday 1/16/19

adorable animal black and white book
Photo by Heather McKeen on Pexels.com

My first reading of 2019 in one of my favorite series, Lyrics & Dirges, hosted and co-founded by Supreme Poetess Sharon Coleman. (Co-founder Mk Chavez is stirring up magic elsewhere this week.)

Lyrics&Dirges
Wednesday, January 16, 2019
7:30 pm
Pegasus Books Downtown
2349 Shattuck Ave, Berkeley, California 94704
(510) 649-1320
Pegasus Books Downtown Berkeley

The Writers who will read:

Joyce E. Young
Sara Mumolo
Joseph Lease
Kimi Sugioka
Mia Ruiz

You won’t want to miss us – words, snacks, and books for sale. My poetry book “How it Happens”  will be available for your purchasing pleasure. Or, you can purchase it here

And did I mention there’s a bookstore cat who loves poetry and books? Well then, of course you must come!

 

Thank You – November Readings

beautiful book celebration close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I want to thank those of you who have come out to support me at the Nomadic Press book launch in September and at the readings in October at Pandemonium Press at The Octopus Literary Salon, Literary Speakeasy at Lit Crawl, and the Bay Area Writing Project at Expressions Gallery. And a big, hearty thank you for buying my book How it Happens​ (Nomadic Press, 2018). 

It’s been wonderful to connect with you and to share community through words, laughter, sighs, reflection, and sometimes tears. I thoroughly enjoy continuing the oral tradition of poetry through readings and events.

I will be at two more readings this month, one on this coming Sunday, November 11th at Adobe Books in San Francisco, and the second on Monday evening November 19th in the Poetry Express series, Himalayan Flavors restaurant in Berkeley.

On Sunday, I will read at the Gears Turning reading series hosted by Kim Shuck, Poet Laureate of San Francisco. I will be reading with and meeting Lauren Ito and for the first time – looking forward to it.

I’m dedicating the Sunday reading to my mom who would have turned 93 on Sunday. She supported me and my writing and I am grateful for her in so many ways.

Gears Turning
Adobe Books and Arts Cooperative
3130 24th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
Sunday, November 11, 2018
4-6 pm
Featured Writers: Lauren Ito, Joyce Young

Host: Kim Shuck, Poet Laureate of San Francisco

I will also be reading at the long running Poetry Express series in Berkeley on Monday, November 19, 2018 at 7 pm. I’m dedicating this reading to gratitude for life itself.

Poetry Express
Himalayan Flavors Restaurant
1585 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94703
Monday evening, November 19, 2018
7pm
Featured Writer: Joyce Young
Host: Bruce Bagnell

I hope to see you at one of these events, hope you’re enjoying reading How it Happens, and if you can’t make it, to a reading, be sure to send me good mojo and spread the word about the book.

To purchase How it Happens, click on Nomadic Press

Bay Area Writing Project – Teachers as Writers at Expressions Gallery

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I’ll be featured tomorrow afternoon as part of the Teachers as Writers series hosted by the Bay Area Writing Project (BAWP). I will have copies of my new book of poems, How it Happens for sale.

The Open Mic is dedicated to student writers K-12, College and students of life.

I hope to see you there.

Here are the details:

Sunday, October 28, 2018
3 – 4:30 pm
Teachers as Writers
Bay Area Writing Project –  BAWP
Expressions Gallery
2035 Ashby Avenue at Adeline
Berkeley, CA 94703
Open mic
Expressions Gallery
Bay Area Writing Project

 

 

New Book. Who’s the lizard?

I really do like the cover of my new poetry chapbook “How it Happens, ” don’t you?

180909 How It Happens by Joyce Young Front Cover

A huge thank you to artist Arthur Johnstone and designer JK Fowler who is also the founder and Executive Director of Nomadic Press (publisher) for their beautiful work!

My book baby is almost in my hands and it can soon be in yours as well. You can preorder signed or unsigned copies of my book here: HOW IT HAPPENS BY JOYCE E. YOUNG

The book launch will be on Saturday September 22, 2018 at 7 pm at the Oakland Peace Center, 111 Fairmount Avenue, Oakland, CA 94611. Come to the launch to hear some of what is inside the book cover. I may even reveal who the lizard is (smile).  You can purchase a copy there and I will gladly sign your book if you wish.

Some of my fellow Nomadic Press authors will read their work that evening, too. It’s going to be a fun time with words, writers, food, books and good mojo. You don’t want to miss this goodness.

 

 

WELL-RED Reading Series at Works/San Jose Tuesday August 14th

poetry-readings-783x522

I am looking forward to reading my work with poet David Denny on Tuesday August 14th in the WELL-RED reading series, at Works/San Jose. I am honored that Poetry Center San Jose asked me to come “down south” to read.

I will be reading poems from my upcoming chapbook “How it Happens” (September, Nomadic Press) and new work. Can’t wait and hope to see you there.

WELL-RED at Works/San Jose

Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 7:00 pm

A Poetry Center San Jose event

at Works/San José
365 South Market Street
in downtown San José
doors open 6:30pm
$2 admission, no one turned away
Works is on the Market Street edge of the San Jose Convention Center,
just to the right of the parking garage entrance

 

 

 

Elephant on the Sidewalk

elephant-animal-herd-of-elephants-elephant-family.jpg

I was recently chatting with a white male neighbor who suddenly launched into talking about a book he had begun to read for his book club. The book focused on race and racial issues in the United States. I had not read the book and was not familiar with it, so I could not speak to it and I told him so. Despite that, my white male neighbor, pressed on with the discussion that he decided he needed to have with me.

He: Have you read this book?

Me: No

He: I think the author tries too hard

Me: Oh?

He: Yes, and in my book club, there seems to be a majority belief that I don’t agree with.

Me: Hmm, but I’m thinking “uh oh” as I sense a rather large elephant standing nearby

He: “Yes, the author really doesn’t provide evidence.”

My neighbor then reads aloud a sentence or two from the book.

The sentence he reads aloud doesn’t help me to understand specifically what he’s referring to, as I haven’t read the book and have told him so, but I sense that there’s an elephant standing beside us, a really big one.

He: “Race has happened all around the world. Many societies had slaves.”

I’m thinking “Here we go again, another white man explaining away slavery in America and its connection to race relations and American society in the 21st century and ignoring the construction of ‘race’ for political and economic purposes, and so much else.”

Me: “Slavery in the U. S. was for economic gain.”

He interrupts me, excitedly.

He: “Yes, it’s about capitalism!”

Me: “Slaves were treated as property, not people, as inhuman, they were objects to be bought and sold.”

He: “Yes! Capitalism and the things that have led to the terrible political things today.”

I’m still feeling the elephant standing on the sidewalk next to us. It’s still quite large.

Me: “Race and racism are two different things.”

My neighbor seems to be using “race” and “racism” interchangeably as he attempts unsuccessfully to make another point about the global historical slave trade. He finally gets to the truth or to what he really wants to say.

Him: “I’m afraid to speak up in my book club. White people need to talk to other white people about this.”

Me: “White people are afraid to talk about race because they are afraid that they will be seen as or called racists. That stops any conversation that could be had and prevents anything from moving forward.”

He looks at me with surprise, as if I have just awakened him from a nap.

Me: “Have you seen the film 13th?”

I’m thinking that because the film so brilliantly and clearly connects the 13th amendment, history of slavery and the prison industrial complex of the present, this might help him to gain some footing on the issues he seems to be floundering in. Plus, guys usually like history. Ava DuVernay made that film with great intention, and it’s perfect for conversations like these and the ones that my neighbor wants to have with other white people.

He: “Yes, we had to view it while reading this book for the book club. It was too heavy; I can’t watch it again.”

Me: “Hmm.” While looking at my phone, I say, “Okay, well I have to get going now.”

He: The mind can overcome this.

Me: “Not without heart.”

He: “Okay, goodbye.”

Me: “Goodbye.”

#52essaysNextWave