Thank You – November Readings

beautiful book celebration close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I want to thank those of you who have come out to support me at the Nomadic Press book launch in September and at the readings in October at Pandemonium Press at The Octopus Literary Salon, Literary Speakeasy at Lit Crawl, and the Bay Area Writing Project at Expressions Gallery. And a big, hearty thank you for buying my book How it Happens​ (Nomadic Press, 2018). 

It’s been wonderful to connect with you and to share community through words, laughter, sighs, reflection, and sometimes tears. I thoroughly enjoy continuing the oral tradition of poetry through readings and events.

I will be at two more readings this month, one on this coming Sunday, November 11th at Adobe Books in San Francisco, and the second on Monday evening November 19th in the Poetry Express series, Himalayan Flavors restaurant in Berkeley.

On Sunday, I will read at the Gears Turning reading series hosted by Kim Shuck, Poet Laureate of San Francisco. I will be reading with and meeting Lauren Ito and for the first time – looking forward to it.

I’m dedicating the Sunday reading to my mom who would have turned 93 on Sunday. She supported me and my writing and I am grateful for her in so many ways.

Gears Turning
Adobe Books and Arts Cooperative
3130 24th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
Sunday, November 11, 2018
4-6 pm
Featured Writers: Lauren Ito, Joyce Young

Host: Kim Shuck, Poet Laureate of San Francisco

I will also be reading at the long running Poetry Express series in Berkeley on Monday, November 19, 2018 at 7 pm. I’m dedicating this reading to gratitude for life itself.

Poetry Express
Himalayan Flavors Restaurant
1585 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94703
Monday evening, November 19, 2018
7pm
Featured Writer: Joyce Young
Host: Bruce Bagnell

I hope to see you at one of these events, hope you’re enjoying reading How it Happens, and if you can’t make it, to a reading, be sure to send me good mojo and spread the word about the book.

To purchase How it Happens, click on Nomadic Press

Bay Area Writing Project – Teachers as Writers at Expressions Gallery

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I’ll be featured tomorrow afternoon as part of the Teachers as Writers series hosted by the Bay Area Writing Project (BAWP). I will have copies of my new book of poems, How it Happens for sale.

The Open Mic is dedicated to student writers K-12, College and students of life.

I hope to see you there.

Here are the details:

Sunday, October 28, 2018
3 – 4:30 pm
Teachers as Writers
Bay Area Writing Project –  BAWP
Expressions Gallery
2035 Ashby Avenue at Adeline
Berkeley, CA 94703
Open mic
Expressions Gallery
Bay Area Writing Project

 

 

The Octopus Literary Salon Wednesday 10/3/18

woman dancing near lights
Photo by Vinicius Vilela on Pexels.com

I am on a roll with readings of late. And that’s a good thing because I really enjoy lit events – being featured, reading with other writers and being in the audience.

This week, I’ll be reading at:

Pandemonium Press Presents

Hot! New! Books!

Wednesday October 3, 2018 at 7:00 pm

The Octopus Literary Salon

2101 Webster Street

Oakland, CA

I’ll be featured with Mary Mackey, Kelly Landmine and Cassandra Dallett

I’d love to see you there!

There will be an open mic.

Food and drinks will be available for purchase as the venue is a café. Yum.

New Book. Who’s the lizard?

I really do like the cover of my new poetry chapbook “How it Happens, ” don’t you?

180909 How It Happens by Joyce Young Front Cover

A huge thank you to artist Arthur Johnstone and designer JK Fowler who is also the founder and Executive Director of Nomadic Press (publisher) for their beautiful work!

My book baby is almost in my hands and it can soon be in yours as well. You can preorder signed or unsigned copies of my book here: HOW IT HAPPENS BY JOYCE E. YOUNG

The book launch will be on Saturday September 22, 2018 at 7 pm at the Oakland Peace Center, 111 Fairmount Avenue, Oakland, CA 94611. Come to the launch to hear some of what is inside the book cover. I may even reveal who the lizard is (smile).  You can purchase a copy there and I will gladly sign your book if you wish.

Some of my fellow Nomadic Press authors will read their work that evening, too. It’s going to be a fun time with words, writers, food, books and good mojo. You don’t want to miss this goodness.

 

 

Photos from Well-RED at Works/San Jose

Here are some photos from the reading at Works/San Jose on August 14th. I enjoyed being featured with David Denny. There were lots of poems, a great open mic, yummy munchies and a poetry-loving audience. And we were surrounded by the exhibit Infinite Memes at Works/San Jose. Thanks to Poetry Center San Jose for a fun evening!

Photos by Robert Pesich/Poetry Center San Jose

Well-RED Reading Series at Works/San Jose this evening

I’m looking forward to reading this evening with David Denny at Works/San Jose

Well-RED
Reading Series
Tuesday, August 14, 7:00pm
features: Joyce E. Young and David Denny

open mic follows

at Works/San José
365 South Market Street
in downtown San José
doors open 6:30pm
$2 admission, no one turned away
Works is on the Market Street edge of the San José Convention Center,
just to the right of the parking garage entrance

http://www.pcsj.org/

https://workssanjose.org/

WELL-RED Reading Series at Works/San Jose Tuesday August 14th

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I am looking forward to reading my work with poet David Denny on Tuesday August 14th in the WELL-RED reading series, at Works/San Jose. I am honored that Poetry Center San Jose asked me to come “down south” to read.

I will be reading poems from my upcoming chapbook “How it Happens” (September, Nomadic Press) and new work. Can’t wait and hope to see you there.

WELL-RED at Works/San Jose

Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 7:00 pm

A Poetry Center San Jose event

at Works/San José
365 South Market Street
in downtown San José
doors open 6:30pm
$2 admission, no one turned away
Works is on the Market Street edge of the San Jose Convention Center,
just to the right of the parking garage entrance

 

 

 

Authors, Readers and Books

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The People’s Republic of Berkeley, my current home, is such a hodge-podge and mix-mash of people. I went to the Bay Area Book Festival this weekend and mingled in that hodge-podge and mix mash of people. And I heard authors of different genres, backgrounds, ages, geographical locations talk about their work and about writing in the context of a theme for each session. The sessions I attended were:

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz author of “Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment” interviewed by T. J. Stiles – history and statistics on gun culture in America that were not entirely surprising, but still…damn. Here’s one: 1/3 of U. S. households have guns, yet there are 300 million guns owned privately in the country, so most of these households contain multiple guns as the U. S. population is about 300 million. Today a gun owner owns “an average of eight guns” according to Dunbar-Ortiz. This number is up from 112 million in the early 1970’s. Whaaat?

Robert Reich and guests in a panel discussion titled: “Income Inequality: A World Gone Mad, Mean and Immoral.” I won’t report back on that one as many are familiar with Reich’s videos do an excellent job of illustrating the not-normal that exists with the American almighty dollar(s).

Melissa de la Cruz, author of YA fantasy, History and Modern Life (also a former writer of the social lives of celebrity elite in New York for major magazines –glossies) interviewed by Jessica Lee. The woman is a highly imaginative, focused and prolific writer with a great sense of humor. Her output of books is stunning and she is still quite young. I loved it that she began writing one of her series of books because she missed New York. So, she created and wrote books about young society vampires. Isn’t that what you would do? Hmmm….I’m originally from Brooklyn, maybe I ought to think about an angle….(smile) Here is a link to Melissa’s web page: http://melissa-delacruz.com/ Her latest YA novel, a sequel titled “Love and War” continues the story of the love between Eliza and Alexander Hamilton.

Lidia Yuknavitch “On Fearlessness, Truth, and Misfits” was interviewed by Daphne Gottlieb. I loved Lidia’s discussion of connecting with her audience without a need to provide graphic descriptions of violent behavior and instances of sexual connections between characters. She goes for the emotional connection. I understood what she was talking about and I also know how difficult that is to do. I’m looking forward to doing more reading of her work. So far, I’ve only read essays, so I have a lot to choose from with her speculative fiction “The Book of Joan,” memoir “The Chronology of Water,” and novels “The Small Backs of Children” and “Dora: A Headcase.” Her most recent book is “The Misfit’s Manifesto.” I’m most interested in speculative fiction these days, so “The Book of Joan” it will most likely be.

Today’s panel was the most powerful session for me and seemed to touch the rest of the audience in the same way. Authors Margaret Wilkerson Sexton (A Kind of Freedom), Rodrigo Hasbún (Affections) and Madeleine Thien (Do not Say We Have Nothing )  were moderated by reviewer Mal Warwick in a panel titled: “Resist: Unlocking the Political Power of the Novel.” The authors’ answers to Mal’s questions were surprising, nuanced, thoughtful and interesting. By the way, Thien’s Tumblr for her novel is fantastic: http://donotsaywehavenothing.tumblr.com/

Margaret, Rodrigo and Maddie’s answers went deep and made me think about a lot of things personal/political as well as the inherent truth that the personal and the political are radically intertwined and that some of us are more aware of this than others. And at the same time, I think that in America many more have become aware of this truth or this living something. I still don’t know what to call it because it isn’t a thing, I don’t really think the word “fact” captures the reality, but it just is and there really isn’t a separation involved unless one is in extreme denial. And some are.

Added to the festival, I listened to an On Being podcast with Buddhist monk and writer Angel Kyodo Williams with host Krista Tippett yesterday, which I found riveting. Williams talked about being optimistic (herself) because all it would take would be a mass of people to do the inner work that would change individual and collective consciousness and shift inner and thus our outer reality. Here’s a link to the webpage for the podcast series: https://onbeing.org/

After taking all of these discussions in, I began to think about what makes something meaningful. I think that what is meaningful does not bloom and flower and grow with analysis. It just is. What is meaningful just is. And dissection, analysis and all of that stuff aren’t really necessary and is just a mental exercise designed to distract me and Lord knows whom else. And too much of it kills the spirit.

There is so much that is meaningful just because it is. Meaningful like call and response, like singing “Ain’t Gonna Let Anybody Turn Me Around” as loud as I can in the car as I drive to work, James Brown singing “Get on the Good Foot,” that moment when Aretha threw her fur coat off her shoulders while singing Natural Woman at the Kennedy Center Honors for Carole King, The Stylistics singing “Betcha By Golly Wow,” and Sam Cooke singing “A Change is Gonna Come.” And hip shakin’ and singin’ along to (y)our own rhythms with no interference.

Not sure what brought this on, but I think it was listening to writers talk bout the work of writing, the work of living. The work is inextricably connected and all part of the one to many of us who write.

How can I separate myself from my writing, from the act of writing? I can’t, writing is part of my life, part of me and has been for a very long time. I am glad that so many younger writers are as invested in writing as I and those of my generation have been. I’m glad that they feel the urgency to give their voices wings. The work continues, the voices rise, the circle opens and new voices enter the choir. Good. Deep gratitude for this cycle that continues.

 

Conversation

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I am not sure whether I have been having a conversation with life or with death of late. Perhaps it’s the same conversation and it doesn’t matter as the two are so intricately intertwined. We can’t know one without eventually experiencing the other.

I took a walk through a local cemetery a few days ago. This might sound maudlin, but it wasn’t that type of experience for me at all. This particular cemetery is a beautifully laid out park in which many have been laid to rest. There are paved as well as gravel lined paths and wide roads on which to walk. There is also a pond and several live fountains. I also found a veterans memorial sculpture that had been erected and etched within the past decade.  In this green space one can find local history laid out through the names on headstones, section names and the annual tulip show, winter holiday light show and other displays. There are runners, dog walkers, nannies with strollers and in the completely green lawns; one person was stretched out in the sun. On the steps of one of the mausoleums, one person was using his laptop while sitting in partial sunlight.

My mom’s transition was the most recent; my dad died a little over 15 years ago. I felt as if something had been wrenched from my guts when he died. It was an unexpected reaction as we’d struggled and disagreed with each other about many things for years. And yet, there were periods of no struggle at all. As a friend once pointed out, we were two generations apart. My father was 42 when I was born and I was his first child. He had been born in 1911 in Alabama. That statement and the truth it reveals holds much weight. When I was able to hear my friend and look at the disagreements from an inter-generational perspective, it made sense that our ways of seeing the world and especially the roles of women in the world were so different and filled with tension. That didn’t make me stop disagreeing with him, but it did provide me with eventual understanding and a softening toward myself and toward my father. Neither one of us could see things very differently because the world that had shaped our development had changed in some ways while I now think it had stood still in other ways, ways that had to do with race and gender. I wonder what my father would say now about the world, or at least this country that we both have called home. Damn.

What happens to one when one has crossed a threshold with the knowledge that there is no turning back even if the desire arises? I am not the same person I was one year ago or two, or more. And at the same time my values have not changed greatly.

When I look in the mirror, I see someone I want to spend time with. And as a writer who has been in it for the long haul, that is a good thing. I know who I am and I like her lots. I don’t want to turn back.

Today is Easter, April Fool’s Day and the first day of National Poetry Month. What a convergence. Should I write a trick poem? Or invoke the Easter Bunny? Or write about the the Phoenix who burned to death and later rose from her ashes? I’m thinking of trying the poem a day for 30 days challenge this month, just for myself, since poetry unearths deep roots for me. I feel the need to reconnect with deep roots these days. And the quiet within the poetry well welcomes me to those roots.

These are some of the tidbits I’ve been gathering on paper and in my head of late. I’m not planning on tying everything together in an essay form. I’m just going to plant seeds and share some of them. This gives me the freedom to write essays or poems or genre-bending thingies as they arise. Good luck to me (smile).

And thank you very much to author Leslieann Hobayan for the inspiration to break free. Her “Deep Thoughts” have helped me to not hold back with my snippets for this week and to get back into the mix. I’m glad to be back.